Free sewing patterns: How to make a fabric tea cosy*

how-to-make-a-fabric-tea-cosy-sewing-pattern

Brighten up your kitchen with Ali Burdon’s easy-sew geometric tea cosy. Embroider 80s-inspired shapes onto your fabric then follow our free sewing pattern below to make a classic fabric tea cosy.

There’s something so comforting about brewing a pot of tea and cracking open a packet of biscuits, especially if said treats are displayed on a fancy plate. Even teapots feel the cold in the winter months though, so keep yours warm with this geometric cosy.

It’s easy enough to sew together, but if you want to up the difficulty factor, embroider small sections of the fabric like we have. Ali picked three thread shades to stitch shapes that echoed those printed on the fabric – take inspiration from her motifs or customise it your own way.

free-sewing-pattern-fabric-tea-cosy-tutorial

You’ll need:

• Two pieces of patterned fabric, 45.5 x 30.5cm (18 x 12″) (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brush Strokes Geo Grid)
• Contrasting fabric (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brush Strokes Trellis in Turquoise)
• Wadding
• Medium-weight iron-on interfacing
• Embroidery thread (we used DMC threads in 444 (yellow), 958 (aqua) and 3804 (pink))
• Tapestry needle
• Embroidery hoop
• Erasable fabric marker

Step 1
Back your patterned fabric with the interfacing, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Photocopy and cut out the template on page 107, then fold under the bottom section along the marked line. Using the fabric marker, draw around the template on the right side (RS) of both pieces of fabric.

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Step 2
If you want to, add embroidered detail using two strands of thread, leaving at least 2cm (¾”) of fabric around the edge unstitched. Once complete, cut out both pieces along the template outline.

how-to-make-a-fabric-tea-cosy-sewing-pattern-step-3

Step 3
Cut two 38 x 5cm (15 x 2″) pieces from your contrasting fabric and back with interfacing. With RS together and raw edges aligned, pin a length of contrasting fabric along the bottom of a patterned piece. Sew together along the bottom raw edge, then press the seam towards the bottom strip. Repeat with the remaining patterned and contrasting fabric pieces.

Step 4
Unfold the template and use to cut out two lining pieces from the wadding. With the fabric wrong side (WS) up and using basting stitch, sew the wadding to the fabric 0.5cm (¼”) in from the edge.

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Step 5
Turn one side of your tea cosy RS up, then reset the stitch length and top stitch along the seams as shown. Repeat with the other side.

Step 6
Cut a 9.5 x 5cm (3¾ x 2″) piece of contrasting fabric. Fold in half along the length to crease, unfold, then fold the two long edges to the crease. Fold in half lengthways, then sew along both long edges – this will create your loop.

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Step 7
Fold the loop fabric in half along the length with WS together. Pin to the RS of a tea cosy side, positioning it centrally at the top with raw edges aligned. Place the tea cosy sides RS together. Pin and sew together along the curved edge, 0.5cm (¼”) in from the basting, leaving the bottom edge open. Snip out your basting stitches, turn the tea cosy RS out and press.

Step 8
Using the full size template, cut two pieces from your contrasting fabric and back with interfacing. With RS together, pin with raw edges aligned, then sew along the curved edge using a 1cm (3/8″) seam allowance. Put the cosy outer inside the lining with RS together, pin and sew around the bottom edge, leaving a 10cm (4″) gap for turning.

Step 9
Turn the cosy RS out through the hole, press, then top stitch around the bottom edge. Fold in the seam allowances of the turning gap, pin together and hand sew closed using a neat slip stitch.

how-to-make-a-fabric-tea-cosy-free-sewing-pattern

ali-burdonAbout Ali Burdon
Ali combines working part-time as a designer and craft blogger with home-educating her twin sons. Her enthusiasms are patchwork and crochet, but she also loves organising group swaps of stitched mini embroidery hoops. Visit her blog for more information, and for craft tutorials. www.veryberryhandmade.co.uk

* This post is sponsored by Tick Tock Tea

Tick Tock Tea - Mollie MakesCrafting and a good cup of tea go hand-in-hand, so it seemed only natural for Tick Tock to team up with Mollie Makes on a series of craft projects for you to try. We encourage you to pop the kettle on, let your creativity flow freely, and make something that makes you happy! Tick Tock celebrates good craftsmanship and fun design, from its hand-harvested teas to iconic colourful packaging. Tick Tock’s naturally caffeine-free rooibos is the perfect cup for crafters to enjoy whenever inspiration hits – morning, noon and night.